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Greenpeace’s toxics campiagn has achieved several victories in the course of our work to protect Americans from preventable chemical disasters, promote sustainable agriculture and keep global waterways free of toxic fashion.

Here are a few critical highlights

Chemical Security Victories

2013

  • President Obama signed an executive order, “Improving Chemical Facility Safety and Security,” that directs the EPA, Departments of Homeland Security and Labor, and other federal agencies to modernize safety and security rules for chemical plants. The EPA is currently considering using their authority to require chemical plants to switch to safer available chemicals or processes.

2009

  • Together with the support of the BlueGreen Alliance the US House of Representatives adopted a chemical plant security bill to require all high risk chemical plants to switch to safer chemicals or processes. The bill died in the Senate in 2010 but became the inspiration for a larger coalition to urge President Obama to use his Clean Air Act authorities to issue new safety and security rules for chemical facilities.
  • The Clorox Company announced they would convert all of their US facilities storing chlorine gas to safer alternatives. The switch to a less toxic substance eliminated a catastrophic hazard for more than 13 million Americans. The company completed the conversions in 2012.

2005

  • Washington, D.C. was the first in the nation to ban the shipment of 90-ton rail cars of chlorine gas and other ultra-hazardous substances through the city.  The law was blocked in court by the Bush administration and the CSX Transportation.  The CSX eventually agreed to voluntarily end the shipments that passed within four blocks of the US Capitol.

  • Joined representatives from a coalition of more than 100 organizations to deliver 60,833 signatures to the White House calling on President Obama to use his authority to prevent chemical disasters.

Detox Victories

  • Luxury brands including Burberry and Valentino made commitments to zero discharge of all hazardous chemicals from its supply chain by 2020. Valentino also committed to zero deforestation regarding its procurement of leather and pulp and paper.
  • As a result of Greenpeace's global toxics victory, several international fashion brands, including Levi's, Victoria's Secret and G-Star, commit to cleaning up their production process. This commitment means protecting water sources in the world's developing countries, in which these brands' factories are located.

Bees in Crisis

  • European Union votes to ban bee-killing pesticides produced by chemical companies Bayer and Syngenta.

  • Greenpeace sends more than 100,000 petitions to the EPA and the House Agriculture Committee demanding a suspension of bee-killing pesticides. Two congressional representatives introduce the "Save the Pollinator's Act" to suspend use of pesticides and protect bees. Oregon passes legislation to label those pesticides in the fall.

Green Electronics Victories

  • Apple announces a phase-out of the most dangerous chemicals in its product line in response to Greenpeace’s award-winning online campaign, called ‘Green My Apple’, and Apple fans worldwide in 2007. The campaign challenged Apple to become a green leader in addressing the electronic waste problem. Apple clears the last hurdle two years later by removing toxic PVC plastic in its new Macbook and iMac.

  • Electronics giants Hewlett Packard, Samsung, Sony, Motorola, LG and more commit to a phase out plan for a range of hazardous chemicals in its products.

  • Apple announces a phase-out of the most dangerous chemicals in its product line in response to Greenpeace’s award-winning online campaign, called ‘Green My Apple’, and Apple fans worldwide in 2007. The campaign challenged Apple to become a green leader in addressing the electronic waste problem. Apple clears the last hurdle two years later by removing toxic PVC plastic in its new Macbook and iMac.
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